Enterprise Architecture, Data Architecture and Business Process Architecture – Better Together

by Zak Cole       • May 25, 2017

A successful data-driven business combines enterprise architecture, data architecture and business process architecture. Integrating these disciplines from the ground up ensures a solid digital foundation on which to build. A strong foundation is necessary because of the amount of data businesses already have to manage. In the last two years, more data has been created than in all of humanity’s history.

And it’s still soaring. Analysts predict that by 2020, we’ll create about 1.7 megabytes of new information every second for every human being on the planet.

While it’s a lot to manage, the potential gains of becoming a data-driven enterprise are too high to ignore. Fortune 1000 companies could potentially net an additional $65 million in income with access to just 10 percent more of their data.

Enterprise Architecture, Data Architecture and Business Process Architecture in Action

To effectively employ enterprise architecture, data architecture and business process architecture, it’s important to know the differences in how they operate and their desired business outcomes.Enterprise Architecture, Data Architecture and Business Process Architecture

Enterprise architecture defines the structure and operation of an organization. Its desired outcome is to determine current and future objectives and translate those goals into a blueprint of IT capabilities.

Data architecture involves models, policies rules or standards that govern what data is collected and how it is stored, arranged, integrated and used within an organization and its various systems. The desired outcome is enabling stakeholders to see business-critical information regardless of its source and relate to it from their unique perspectives.

Business process architecture represents the elements of a business and how they interact with the aim of aligning people, processes, data, technologies and applications to meet organizational objectives. It aims to provide a real-world picture of how an organization functions, including opportunities to create, improve, harmonize or eliminate processes to improve overall performance and profitability.

Better Together

Historically, these three disciplines have been siloed, without an inherent means of sharing information. Therefore, collaboration between the tools and relevant stakeholders has been difficult.

To truly power a data-driven business, removing these silos is paramount, so as not to limit the potential analysis your organization can carry out. Businesses that understand and adopt this approach will benefit from much better data management when it comes to the   ‘3 Vs.’

They’ll be better able to cope with the massive amounts (volume) of data a data-driven business will introduce; be better equipped to process this data accurately and quickly in order to keep time to markets low; and be able to effectively manage data from a growing number of different sources (variety).

In essence, enabling collaboration between enterprise architecture, data architecture and business process architecture helps an organization manage “any data, anywhere” – or Any2. This all-encompassing view provides the potential for deeper data analysis.

However, attempting to manage all your data without all the necessary tools is like trying to read a book without all the chapters. And trying to manage data with a host of uncollaborative, disparate tools is like trying to read a story with chapters from different books. Clearly neither approach is ideal.

Unifying the disciplines as the foundation for data management provides organizations with the whole ‘data story.’

The importance of getting the whole data story should be very clear considering the aforementioned statistic – Fortune 1000 companies could potentially net an additional $65 million in income with access to just 10 percent more of their data.

To learn more about data management tools, particularly enterprise architecture, data architecture and business process architecture, working in tandem, click here.

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